Friday, June 23, 2017

Musical Interlude: 2002, “Suddenly Yours”

2002, “Suddenly Yours”

"A Look to the Heavens"

“Star cluster Westerlund 1 is home to some of the largest and most massive stars known. It is headlined by the star Westerlund 1-26, a red supergiant star so big that if placed in the center of our Solar System, it would extend out past the orbit of Jupiter. Additionally, the young star cluster is home to 3 other red supergiants, 6 yellow hypergiant stars, 24 Wolf-Rayet stars, and several even-more unusual stars that continue to be studied. 
Click image for larger size.
Westerlund 1 is relatively close-by for a star cluster at a distance of 15,000 light years, giving astronomers a good laboratory to study the development of massive stars. The featured image of Westerlund 1 was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope toward the southern constellation of the Altar (Ara). Although presently classified as a "super" open cluster, Westerlund 1 may evolve into a low mass globular cluster over the next billion years.”

Chet Raymo, “In A Dark Time...”

“In A Dark Time...”
by Chet Raymo

“I've quoted a few of these lines before, from a poem by Charles Simic:

"It's like fishing in the dark.
Our thoughts are the hooks,
Our heart the raw bait.

We cast the line past all believing
Into the night sky
Until it's lost to sight."

In a sense, that's the story of my life: a long love affair with the night sky. My first book of popular science was “365 Starry Nights”. My first book of personal prose was “The Soul of the Night: An Astronomical Pilgrimage”. “An Intimate Look at the Night Sky” followed much later, but every book in between, fiction and non-fiction, cast a line into the night sky.

What is it about the starry night that gives rise so effectively to what might be called the "religious instinct"? The dark, precisely. The unplumbable depth. The hiddenness. The silence.

The infinity. The abyss of time. I can calculate the number of thimblefuls of water in the sea, but I have no way of knowing how many galaxies there are in the universe, or whether the universe is finite or infinite, or even how many universes might exist. Or where the universe came from. Or where it's going.

I stand barefoot on the terrace in the dark of night, and looking is a kind of prayer. A prayer without words. Without supplication. A silent acknowledgement of ignorance. Heartfelt ignorance. An ignorance that is a receptacle aching to be filled.

"My heart the bait."

The dark night of the soul. The starlit valley of shadow. The knowing that unknows. There, just there, hanging between Cassiopeia and Perseus, the barely visible blur of the double cluster, the rent veil of the temple.

“The line's long unraveling
Rising in our throats like a sigh.”

"Sooner Or Later..."

“Sooner or later everyone sits down to a banquet of consequences.”
– Robert Louis Stevenson

X22 Report, “Everything Is In Place, The Fed Unwind Is The Last Step, This Is The Warning”

 X22 Report, “Everything Is In Place, The Fed Unwind Is The Last Step, 
This Is The Warning”
Related followup report:

Musical Interlude: Deuter, “Atmospheres”

Deuter, “Atmospheres”

The Daily "Near You?"

Easley, South Carolina, USA. Thanks for stopping by!

Free Download: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, "The Gulag Archipelago"

“If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them. But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being. And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart? During the life of any heart this line keeps changing place; sometimes it is squeezed one way by exuberant evil and sometimes it shifts to allow enough space for good to flourish. One and the same human being is, at various ages, under various circumstances, a totally different human being. At times he is close to being a devil, at times to sainthood. But his name doesn't change, and to that name we ascribe the whole lot, good and evil.

Socrates taught us: 'Know thyself!'” 
- Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Freely download "The Gulag Archipelago", by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, here:

“The Dangerous World of Logical Fallacies”

“The Dangerous World of Logical Fallacies” 
by Mario Livio

“Thinkers in disciplines ranging from mathematics to economics, and from science to philosophy, attempt to construct theorems, theories, or scenarios, that have at least a fighting chance of being correct. Since in many cases one of the chief guides is logical reasoning, the ability to spot fallacies is an essential skill. In this piece I will briefly discuss a few such potential traps, and I hope to describe a few more in a future blog entry.

One fairly common fallacy is known as the "post-hoc" (Latin for "after this") fallacy. This is the notion that because one event happened to follow another, cause and effect are implied. This type of faulty reasoning has helped to make many "healers" and "psychics" very rich. The placebo effect notwithstanding, the fact that someone's health improved following a visit to such a healer does not imply any causal relation. Similarly, if you fell and broke your leg after a black cat had crossed your path, don't blame the cat. This is not to say, of course, that one should not investigate cases in which a certain sequence of events repeats itself multiple times.

Here is an example of a common logical fallacy known as the ad hominem argument, which is Latin for "argument against the person" or "argument toward the person". Basically, an ad hominem argument goes like this:
Person 1 makes claim X.
There is something objectionable about Person 1.
Therefore claim X is false.

Another known fallacy is that of the "false dilemma." For instance, the question: "Is mathematics an invention or a discovery?" leaves you with the impression that these are the only two options, and that the two are mutually exclusive. In fact, I believe that mathematics is an intricate combination of intertwined inventions and discoveries. Similarly, a statement such as: "The government should invest either in scientific research or in education" is false, since it could actually do both (clearly within budgetary constraints). The world isn't just black or white. In general, one should always carefully examine phrases that start with "the choice is clear," since those can potentially hide false dilemmas.

Studies show that one of the most frequently occurring fallacies involves logic flowing in the wrong direction. The argument goes like this: If P is true, then Q necessarily follows. Q is true, therefore P is true. For instance, if Earth is the only planet on which intelligent life exists, then clearly we will not find any signs of intelligent life on other planets. However, just because we have not found extraterrestrial intelligent life yet, we should not conclude that such ET life does not exist. To make things a bit closer to home, consider the following situation that probably many young (and not so young) people have experienced. A man thinks: "If she is not interested in seeing me again, she may say that she has another commitment tonight." This may be true, but if the woman in question has sent him a text message saying that she has another commitment, he should not automatically conclude that she is not interested.

Some fallacies are very seductive, and avoiding them requires a close examination of the logic involved. A famous one concerns the warning against stepping onto a "slippery slope." No one likes to embark on something that inevitably leads to disaster, but one should always investigate how likely such a slide truly is. The fact that something could happen doesn't necessarily mean that it will, or even that it is likely to happen- not every action opens the floodgates. In particular, we should never allow fear of fallacious slippery slopes to stifle our natural curiosity.”
Click image for larger size.
Related:

"Like, Should and Will"

"Like, Should and Will"
by The Zman

People who enjoy quantitative analysis of current events and social policy tend to get irritated by the fact that most people don’t know what “average” means. In fact, most people don’t know the difference between the words “some”, “all” and “many”, treating them as if they are synonyms. The easiest way to activate the nearest outrage machine is to say something like “Some women….” and you can be sure a local gal will clutch her pearls and tell you she is nothing like whatever you described. It’s madness.

Something similar happens to people when discussing social policy or describing a cultural phenomenon. What is good for society, may not always be good for each member of society. Similarly, what you like may not scale up very well. Open borders fanatics fall into this trap. They look at the quaint ethnic eateries around their college campus and think, “This is how it should be everywhere!” They never stop to think if it should be something we attempt and they never think about what actually will happen.

It’s not just liberals and libertarians that get confused by this. Lots of people say they want America to return to its constitutional founding, never stopping to think if we should actually try to do it. If we tried to roll back the 19th Amendment, there would be endless protests, even if every state promised women the franchise. Rolling back the Reconstruction Amendments would launch a civil war. You may like the idea of going back to the original, but we shouldn’t attempt it, which is why we will never try it.

This circles back to the topic of internet commerce. Lots of people like the convenience of ordering on-line and having their goods delivered to them. Some people like the fact they can buy on-line from cheaper foreign sources, thus saving some money. That’s perfectly understandable, but that does not mean we should, as a society, let Amazon monopolize the retail marketplace. There may be ugly trade-offs. Even if we can figure it out, that does not mean we will act accordingly. Instead, we will plow ahead and learn the hard way.

The easy thing to get right is what you like. The old maxim about being conservative about what you know best applies here. All the people screaming at me for questioning the wisdom of letting Amazon own the marketplace are doing so because they know how much they like shopping on-line. They don’t want any discussion of changing it. They know their tastes and habits better than anyone so they are the most conservative about those things. As a result, they instinctively recoil at any criticism of the internet economy.

To be clear, we all do this to some degree. I reject any and all efforts to impose regulations on gun ownership. I know the gun laws better than most and I know the gun statistics better than most. The only changes I favor are repeals of existing laws, but any mention of “gun laws” or “gun crimes” puts me in a defensive crouch. The most conservative position is to resists any discussion of changing gun laws so that is my default position. As a result, I probably have a few things wrong about the gun debate.

Where things always get squirrelly is when the topic moves into what we should do as a society. Libertarians, of course, leave the room at this point because they think “should” means “must” and they are against coercion. This is one of the reasons I have so little patience with libertarians. Politics is about what will be done and that results from the debate over what should be done. The libertarian impulse to retreat into proselytizing about their principles makes them worse than useless in the war with the Left.

Liberals claim to hold the moral high ground so all of their proclamations about what should be done are invested with moral authority. It is why they frame every debate in moral terms. That way, they avoid the granular analysis of what they are doing, so the focus shifts to the morality of their intentions. It is often assumed that this is a deliberate tactic, but it is instinctual. Progressivism is a religion. The adherents naturally frame everything in terms of their faith, in the same way Muslims rely on the Koran for their authority.

Buckley conservatives abandoned public morality long ago, so they are reduced to turning everything into a math problem. This appeals to many libertarian-ish people which is why you see so many of them hanging around the Official Right™. It would be nice if public policy could be decided, at least to some degree, by mathematics, but there’s no history of that ever happening, which means it will most likely never happen. It’s why the Buckley Right has lost every fight over the last 25 years. You don’t beat morality with math.

Of course, no matter what your conception of what should happen is, the odds that it will happen are fairly low. Even the most modest plans have unintended consequences and most of us are easily deluded by our sense of righteousness. It is why Progressivism has devolved into a madhouse of lunacy. They stand on their soapboxes sermonizing about what should happen, only to see the opposite happen. The recent string of elections has them thinking the gods have abandoned them, which is why they are so distraught.

This is not a post with some great important point to make so I’ll wrap it up. The one take away here is that when I write about some public phenomenon, I’m usually looking at it from the various angles of the “should” position. Is this something we should embrace? Is this something we should tolerate? That sort of thing. You may like midget porn, for example, but we should not have it on television. On the other hand, you may hate paying your taxes, but we should enforce tax laws, even the terrible ones.”

"How It Really Is"

This doesn't deter them, though...

"Yes Mr. Putin, We Americans Have Lost Our Mind"

"Yes Mr. Putin, We Americans Have Lost Our Mind"
by James Howard Kunstler

“Have you all lost your mind?” Vladimir Putin replied to one of Megyn Kelly’s thrusts about alleged Russian perfidy toward the US in the gala interview that debuted her new Sunday Night star-chamber on NBC. Old Vlad put his finger on something there. His view of the late goings-on in America is like that of the proverbial detached Martian observer of strange Earthly doings, rattling his antennae and clicking his mouth-parts in mirth.

To which retort, by the way, one would have to answer, ”Yes, absolutely.” The toils of slow economic collapse, accompanied by the ceaseless effort by various arms of the Deep State to spin “the narrative” around the voting public’s collective head, has driven the polity insane. And this, of course, is on view in the bedlam that US politics has become, Trump and all. I’m waiting for The New York Times to run the three-column headline that says Russia Racist, Misogynist, and Islamophobic to finally bring together the programmed paranoia of NeoCon/DemProg alliance with the esprit de corp of the new collegiate Red Guard.

Mr. Putin does not have to lift a finger to detonate the groaning garbage barge of US domestic affairs. It’s already ignited and is faring toward a very peculiar species of civil war. You can be sure that the NeoCon/ DemProg axis is determined to get rid of Trump at all costs. Impeachment requires some sort of high crime or misdemeanor. So far, going on a year, they haven’t come up with any evidence that the Golden Golem of Greatness acted as a Russian agent in some fashion, and that itself has got to be a little suspicious, considering the thousands of clerks in the spinning mills of those legendary seventeen Intel outfits the government runs. How could they fail to come up with a video of the Donald and Vladimir swatting each other playfully with birch switches in a Moscow banya? Five TV sitcom writers could surely come up with an angle - as long as it was a plausible entertainment.

In the meantime, Trump prevails, the mad bull elephant of the Republican herd, majestically swinging his trunk against everything breakable in the political china shop while trumpeting “Covfefe! Covfefe!” With the Paris Climate Accords the op-ed writers in the usual places bounced off the walls of their virtual rubber room in response. Paul Krugman had to be dragged down to hydrotherapy at the NYT after he set his hair on fire. And Rachel Maddow practically popped a carotid artery in her muscular neck from all that shrieking.

I’m a bit more sanguine about the US withdrawal. To me, the Paris Accords were just another feel-good PR stunt enabling politicians to pretend that they could control forces that are already way out-of-hand, an international vanity project of ass-covering. The coming economic collapse will depress global industrial activity whether anybody likes it or not, and despite anyone’s pretense of good intentions - and then we will have a range of much more practical problems of everyday life to contend with.

Of course, Trump cannot possibly see it that way, given his wish to bring back the America of humming factories and happy workers seeing the USA in their Chevrolets and all that. That fantasy will eventually fade as the inability to get anything done in Washington becomes manifest and obvious. When the “basket of deplorables” sees their hopes dribble away, they will start in with serious mischief of their own, without Trump having to prompt them. Then it will be a quixotic battle between them and the BLM/SJW proxies that the higher-up chickensh*ts of DemProgdom have so carefully groomed as their vanguard. There will be blood.

Yes, Mr. P, America has lost its mind. The whole thing has turned into some kind of nonstop Kardashian tranny monster truck sh*t-show of manufactured melodrama and lost causes, inducing a kind of global nausea that may ultimately prove more fatal than the rising surface temperature and melting icecaps. Russia, to its credit, and whatever else you think about it, has some regard for its own survival. Our country prefers the excitement of self-destruction.”

"Stockman Warns Of 'Huge Air Pocket Between Wall Street Fantasy & Economic Reality'"

"Stockman Warns Of 'Huge Air Pocket 
Between Wall Street Fantasy & Economic Reality'"
by Craig Wilson

"David Stockman joined Boom Bust to discuss the massive storm that is building and about to slam into Wall Street. During the discussion Stockman reveals what he believes is ahead for the stocks in the market and the economy. The interview began with the Boom Bust host asking the acclaimed author about his concern surrounding a government shutdown.  David Stockman began “we’re in the midst of the biggest political train wreck in modern history. There will be no governance in Washington. There will be no tax bill, stimulus or infrastructure. We’re heading for an expiration of the debt ceiling and running out of cash that will create an enormous crisis by August or September. They’re not going to be able to cope with it.”


“I think the odds by the day are increasing that we’re going to have a government shutdown. Expect the mother of all debt ceiling crisis. The market is utterly unprepared and it really is the orange swan that is about ready to take Wall Street by surprise.”

When prompted about the potential shocks to the S&P 500 and the threats stocks face in a severe decline Stockman continued to offer his sobering analysis. The former Reagan cabinet member noted, “The market today is trading at 25 times S&P 500 earnings which were $100 a share in the period ending in March. That represents a tiny growth from $85 a share back in June 2007 – ten years ago. We’re about 1.2% over the last decade. Why would you pay 25 times earnings for one percent growth after a tepid expansion of 100 months that’s near the end of its “sell by date?”

“We’re going to have a recession, likely sooner than later, and the market is dramatically overpriced. I would say sixteen times earnings given all the headwinds in the world and chaos in Washington. The Fed is now finally going to begin to shrink its balance sheet and not just a little bit but by $2 trillion over the next two or three years. With all of that staring us in the face, the market is barely worth 1,600. There is a huge air pocket between the huge fantasy that prevails on Wall Street and the reality of the economic world.”

Deep State and the Stocks on Wall Street: When asked whether he still felt nothing would pass in Washington before 2018 Stockman stood firm. “I am sure they would like to pass something. They don’t have the votes. They don’t have the consensus. Here we are and June is almost over. They haven’t even passed in the Senate yet a bill to repeal and replace Obamacare. If they do, it is totally incompatible with the House. They can’t get a Conference report before Labor Day, if ever.”

Speaking on the budgetary concerns awakening the halls of Washington, Stockman leveled, “They haven’t even started on the budget resolution for 2018. Without a budget resolution, there’s no tax bill because you need reconciliation to pass any tax bill at all. The reason I saw a government shutdown is because the debt ceiling is now frozen at $19.8 trillion. They have $150 billion in cash. It is draining away by $2-$3 billion a day. They will be out of cash and there is no majority in the House or the Senate, for that matter, to pass a clean debt ceiling bill.”

Stockman left with a final warning for stocks noting that, “Without a clean bill, you’re having an enormous fight over what’s that quid-pro-quo to raise the debt ceiling. That will not end easily. It is likely to end in a complete breakdown like we saw in 2011.”

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Greg Hunter, “Weekly News Wrap-Up 6/23/2017”

“Weekly News Wrap-Up 6/23/2017”
By Greg Hunter’s USAWatchdog.com

"The Middle East had near dogfight aerial combat in the skies over Syria. The U.S. shot down a Syrian fighter jet and an Iranian drone. Russia immediately halted cooperation with the U.S. in Syria, and warned it would “intercept” any aircraft in areas it controlled. Russia also charged the U.S. that America was “supporting terrorists.” One former Obama Administration insider says, “The risk of a big war is rising.”

If you want to measure how well the economy is doing, you should take a look at the hard data and the soft data. The soft data shows the so-called “Trump Bump” has decidedly turned negative, and the hard data of the real economy has also taken a plunge. In the real world, the State of Illinois has joined the ranks of Puerto Rico for major money problems. The Illinois Comptroller says “The state can no longer function.” Illinois has no money to pay its bills or interest payments and for all intents and purposes is insolvent. Powerball has cut off Illinois from selling its lottery tickets because the state is dead broke. Many other states are going to be in the same shape as Illinois in the not-so-distant future.

Donald Trump had it right when he said if were not for the three to five million illegal votes, he would have won the popular vote in 2016. According to a new study by the nonpartisan group “Just Facts,” 5.7 million noncitizens “may have cast illegal votes.” Keep in mind, this does not take into account massive voter and election fraud in places like Detroit, where there were as many as 6 times more votes than registered voters."

"Join Greg Hunter as he looks back at the week’s top stories in the Weekly News Wrap-Up"

“Hope”

“Hope”

“There is no love of life without despair of life."
- Albert Camus

“Hope is a gift you don’t have to surrender, a power you don’t have to throw away. And though hope can be an act of defiance, defiance isn’t enough reason to hope. But there are good reasons. It’s important to emphasize that hope is only a beginning; it’s not a substitute for action, only a basis for it.

It’s important to say what hope is not: it is not the belief that everything was, is, or will be fine. The evidence is all around us of tremendous suffering and tremendous destruction. The hope I’m interested in is about broad perspectives with specific possibilities, ones that invite or demand that we act. It’s also not a sunny everything-is-getting-better narrative, though it may be a counter to the everything-is-getting-worse narrative. You could call it an account of complexities and uncertainties, with openings.

Hope locates itself in the premises that we don’t know what will happen and that in the spaciousness of uncertainty is room to act. When you recognize uncertainty, you recognize that you may be able to influence the outcomes - you alone or you in concert with a few dozen or several million others. Hope is an embrace of the unknown and the unknowable, an alternative to the certainty of both optimists and pessimists. Optimists think it will all be fine without our involvement; pessimists take the opposite position; both excuse themselves from acting. It’s the belief that what we do matters even though how and when it may matter, who and what it may impact, are not things we can know beforehand. We may not, in fact, know them afterward either, but they matter all the same, and history is full of people whose influence was most powerful after they were gone.”
- Rebecca Solnit

Oliver Álain Christie, Shakespeare, "Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow"


Shakespeare's "Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow"
Read by Oliver Álain Christie

MACBETH:
"What is that noise?"

SEYTON:
"It is the cry of women, my good lord."
(Exit SEYTON)

MACBETH:
"I have almost forgot the taste of fears.
The time has been my senses would have cooled
To hear a night-shriek, and my fell of hair
Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir
As life were in ’t. I have supped full with horrors.
Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts
Cannot once start me."

(Re-enter SEYTON)
"Wherefore was that cry?"

SEYTON:
"The queen, my lord, is dead.

MACBETH"
"She should have died hereafter;
There would have been a time for such a word.
Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more: it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing."

"Eventually You Understand..."

"That's where it all begins. That's where we all get screwed big time as we grow up. They tell us to think, but they don't really mean it. They only want us to think within the boundaries they define. The moment you start thinking for yourself - really thinking - so many things stop making any sense. And if you keep thinking, the whole world just falls apart. Nothing makes sense anymore. All rules, traditions, expectations - they all start looking so fake, so made up. You want to just get rid of all this stuff and make things right. But the moment you say it, they tell you to shut up and be respectful. And eventually you understand that nobody wants you to really think for yourself."
- Ray N. Kuili

"The Fourth Turning: A Summer Of Rage And The Total Eclipse Of The Deep State"

"The Fourth Turning: 
A Summer Of Rage And The Total Eclipse Of The Deep State"
by Michael Hart 

“If you do a worldwide survey of eclipse lore, the theme that constantly appears, with few exceptions, is it’s always a disruption of the established order,” said E. C. Krupp, director of the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, California. That’s true of both solar and lunar eclipses.  “People depend on the sun’s movement,” Krupp said. “It’s regular, dependable, you can’t tamper with it. And then, all of a sudden, Shakespearean tragedy arrives and time is out of joint. The sun and moon do something that they shouldn’t be doing.”

On August 21st of this year, the United States will witness its first total solar eclipse seen across the totality of the country in nearly forty years. For millennia, humans have gazed towards the skies in awe, observing that heavenly bodies move regularly and predictably with mathematical certainty, and this has inspired poets, philosophers, and other thinkers to ruminate on man’s relationship to the universe, and the possibility that human activity is ruled by laws and patterns independent of human activity.

Although many of these ideas that were fashionable hundreds of years ago, such as astrology, have been put to rest by contemporary scientific knowledge, perhaps there is value to be gleaned from entertaining the possibility that there are indeed larger forces and patterns governing human affairs. Against the backdrop of this cosmically anomalous event, are we on the cusp of a more temporal form of disruption this summer in the United States?

Since President Donald Trump’s stunning victory over Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, much of the press have made note of Steve Bannon’s interest in an influential book published in 1997 called, “The Fourth Turning: What Cycles of History Tell Us About America’s Next Rendezvous With Destiny.”

In this book, authors William Strauss and Neil Howe make the argument that our ideas about the nature of history, linear time, and progress are illusory, and that if we want a more accurate concept about the way that history unfolds, we would do well to study the ancient Greek concept of cyclical time. This concept views national and global historical phenomenon not as randomly occurring events, or the linear march of historical “progress,” but instead sees them as recurring archetypes placed into a larger tapestry of a greater repeating historical cycle.

According to Strauss and Howe, the relative geographic and historical isolation of the United States provides a unique opportunity to view this cycle unfolding regularly and predictably every 80 years. This 80-year cycle can be divided into four stages or seasons, each lasting approximately twenty years:

High– This initial stage occurs immediately following a period of crisis. The High is characterized by strong institutions, a sense of collective destiny, and a weakness of individuality. The most recent example of this would be the period of prosperity and conformity in the U.S. immediately following the conclusion of World War II.

Awakening- The second stage, or turning, is a period of questioning established values and asserting one’s independence from established norms and morals, be they spiritual or political. This stage may be seen as a rebellion of the previous era’s emphasis on material wealth and conformity. The 1960’s, with the psychedelic revolution, anti-war protests, Civil Rights marches, and New Age spiritual movements can be seen as recent characteristics of this second stage, as well as Reaganomics and the mid-1980s Wall Street ethos.

Unraveling- The emphasis on autonomy and the questioning of spiritual, political, and individual authority in the Awakening stage eventually destabilizes society, leading to the Third Turning, in which institutions are weak and untrusted while the subjective experience of the individual is emphasized. This stage can be thought of as the inverse of the initial High stage, where collective destiny is replaced by atomization. Recent symptom of this stage would be the culture wars, corporate malfeasance, a lack of faith in government, social justice movements, and political correctness.

Crisis- In the Fourth Turning, a destabilizing event, usually involving warfare, leads to the destruction and reconstruction of institutions of power. In the face of destruction, Americans are forced to unite and forge a vision to restructure a disrupted society. This fourth stage can be seen as the inverse of the Awakening stage, and the authors cite World War II as the defining event of the most recent period of Crisis.

Strauss and Howe predicted that the next Crisis period that the U.S. would face would happen sometime around 2005 and end around 2025. Anyone who has been paying attention over the last decade would have a difficult time refuting this. The financial crisis of 2008 threw the planet into discord, and we are now just beginning to see some of the political ramifications of this. We may be reaching the apex of this crisis this summer, or at least we will witness a significant acceleration of it.

The institutions that once defined American stability are rapidly crumbling. Mounting debt, unsustainable consumerism, and illegal immigration are chipping away at once sturdy foundation of America. And the robust civil discourse needed to solve these problems has been interrupted by advocates of social justice, sometimes violently. Recent small skirmishes between the two sides may be headed toward larger eruptions.

Some analysts are predicting a ‘Summer of Rage’, which will boil over in violent protests all across the United States. The DNC has called for a George Soros-financed ‘Resistance Summer’, in which protestors are encouraged to invade town halls, and organize rallies and neighborhood meetings to undermine President Trump. This will culminate in a national training being billed as a ‘Resistance Summer Camp’ to effectively train operatives in organizing strategies.

Meanwhile, other leftist groups are calling for a day of ‘Impeachment Marches’ on July 2nd in dozens of major cities across the country. Their goal is to pressure congressional representatives to begin impeachment proceedings against President Trump. Emboldened by a mainstream media apparatus which functions as a mouthpiece of Deep State interests, these activists are determined to overturn democratically elected officials and overturn law and order on the grounds that they personally disagree with the results.

As we have seen in recent months, Trump supporters, conservatives, and other patriots are not afraid to confront leftist activists in the streets, and this is likely to intensify as these DNC-backed groups become more desperate and confrontational in their tactics.

James Comey’s congressional testimony showed that the Trump administration is indeed attempting to break the old political order and its far-too-power Deep State. The cracks are surfacing now, and this will likely shatter and spill into many facets of social life outside of the realm of politics. This shattering seems to be the apex, or perhaps the precursor to the major Crisis event described by Strauss and Howe in the Fourth Turning, and it is proving to be a global movement, as evidenced by the recent elections this week in the United Kingdom.

As the Soros-backed DNC footsoldiers wreak havoc in American cities this summer, and the old political order is eclipsed by what is shaping up to be a much more democratic order, we can expect these types of events to increase in frequency as well as intensity.

Conclusion: Like it or not, divided we stand is the inner workings of the Deep State. America peaked many decades ago during the so-called ‘American High’. Since then, the middle class has been stripped of it’s wealth via the Federal Reserve and the Top .01%. To cover this great theft, the Deep State had divided the American people into a powder-keg expected to unleash in the ‘summer of rage’.

Here is an illustration of when the ‘Great Theft of the Middle Class Started’:
All the while, the American people are too busy clashing with one another - the top .01% calmly walk away."

"The Good Fight"


“The 13th Warrior: Prayers Before Final Battle”

Ahmed Ibn Fahdlan: 
“Merciful Father, I have squandered my days with plans of many things. 
This was not among them...
 But at this moment, I beg only to live the next few minutes well.
 For all we ought to have thought, and have not thought;
all we ought to have said, and have not said;
all we ought to have done, and have not done...
I pray thee God for forgiveness.”

Buliwyf:
“Lo, there do I see my father.
Lo, there do I see my mother and my sisters, and my brothers.
Lo, there do I see the line of my people back to the beginning.
Lo, they do call to me,
they bid me take my place among them in the Halls of Valhalla,
where the brave may live forever.”

"The Good Fight"
by Paulo Coelho

"In 1986, I went for the first and only time on the pilgrimage known as the Way to Santiago, an experience I described in my first book. We had just finished walking up a small hill, a village appeared on the horizon, and it was then that my guide, whom I shall call Petrus (although that was not his name), said to me: "We must never stop dreaming. Dreams provide nourishment for the soul, just as a meal does for the body. Many times in our lives we see our dreams shattered and our desires frustrated, but we have to continue dreaming. If we don’t, our soul dies.

The Good Fight is the one we fight because our heart asks it of us.The Good Fight is the one that’s fought in the name of our dreams. When we are young our dreams first explode inside us with all of their force, we are very courageous, but we haven’t yet learned how to fight. With great effort, we learn how to fight, but by then we no longer have the courage to go into combat. So we turn against ourselves and do battle within. We become our own worst enemy. We say that our dreams were childish, or too difficult to realize, or the result or our not having known enough about life. We kill our dreams because we are afraid to fight the Good Fight.

The first symptom of the process of killing our dreams is lack of time. The busiest people I have known in my life always have time enough to do everything. Those who do nothing are always tired and pay no attention to the little amount of work they are required to do. They complain constantly that the day is too short. The truth is, they are afraid to fight the Good Fight.

The second symptom of the death of our dreams lies in our certainties. Because we don’t want to see life as a grand adventure, we begin to think of ourselves as wise and fair and correct in asking so little of life. We look beyond the walls of our day-to-day existence, and we hear the sound of lances breaking, we smell the dust and the sweat, and we see the great defeats and the fire in the eyes of the warriors. But we never see the delight, the immense delight in the hearts of those engaged in the battle. For them, neither victory nor defeat is important; what’s important is only that they are fighting the Good Fight.

And, finally, the third symptom of the passing of our dreams is peace. Life becomes a Sunday afternoon; we ask for nothing grand, and we cease to demand anything more than we are willing to give. In that state we think of ourselves as being mature; we put aside the fantasies of our youth, and we seek personal and professional achievement. We are surprised when people our age say that they still want this or that out of life. But really, deep in our hearts, we know that what has happened is that we have renounced the battle for our dreams - we have refused to fight the Good Fight.

When we renounce our dreams and find peace, we go through a period of tranquility. But the dead dreams begin to rot within us and to infect our entire being. We become cruel to those around us, and then we begin to direct this cruelty against ourselves. What we sought to avoid in combat - disappointment and defeat - came upon us because of our cowardice. And one day, the dead, spoiled dreams make it difficult to breath, and we actually seek death. It’s death that frees us from our certainties, from our work, and from that terrible peace of Sunday afternoons.”